ĐỀ THI CHỌN HỌC SINH GIỎI

Văn bản

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Điểm Giám khảo 1 Giám khảo 2 Số phách

Bằng số Bằng chữ

A. LISTENING (40 points)

HƯỚNG DẪN PHẦN THI NGHE HIỂU

Bài nghe gồm 3 phần, mỗi phần được nghe 2 lần, mỗi lần cách nhau 15 giây, mở đầu và kết thúc mỗi phần nghe có tín hiệu.

Mở đầu và kết thúc bài nghe có tín hiệu nhạc. Thí sinh có 3 phút để hoàn chỉnh bài trước tín hiệu nhạc kết thúc bài nghe.

Mọi hướng dẫn cho thí sinh (bằng tiếng Anh) đã có trong bài nghe.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Part 1: You will hear a radio report about interactive science and technology centres in Britain.

Complete the sentences, using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS. (20 pts)

- The area on which the National Stone Centre stands has been used for a long time for the mining of lead and (1) ______.

- (2) ______ to the centre are surprised to discover how much stone people (3) ______.

- Examples of the use of stone in (4) ______ shown are tunnels and (5) ______.

- The headmaster describes the centre as an excellent (6) ______.

- Techniquest can house (7) ______ exhibits and science “interactives” experiments which people of all ages can try out for themselves.

- At Techniquest, a special (8) ______ is used for teaching people about centrifugal force.

- People can learn about the effect that (9) ______ can have on each other at Techniquest.

- A dragon is used for teaching people about (10) ______ at Techniquest.

Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

TRẠI HÈ HÙNG VƯƠNG LẦN THỨ XII BẮC GIANG 2016

ĐỀ THI CHỌN HỌC SINH GIỎI

MÔN: TIẾNG ANH – KHỐI 11 Ngày thi: 31 tháng 7 năm 2016

Thời gian làm bài:180 phút (không kể thời gian giao đề) (Đề thi có 13 trang)

THÍ SINH LÀM BÀI TRỰC TIẾP VÀO TẬP TỜ ĐỀ THI ĐỀ CHÍNH THỨC

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Part 2. Listen to a recording material and give short answers to the following questions (10 pts) 1. What should one do to decrease melatonin production when having to wake up in darkness?

___________________________________________________________________________

2. Why should one expose himself to cold water?

___________________________________________________________________________

3. In the morning, what is replenished when drinking a glass of water?

___________________________________________________________________________

4. What is the 4th scientific tip to kick one’s body into gear?

___________________________________________________________________________

5. Why does physical activity enhance cognition?

___________________________________________________________________________

Part 3. You will hear part of a radio programme in which a new book is being reviewed (10 pts) For questions 1-5, choose the correct answer A, B, C or D

1. The main reason that Isabella was unlikely to become a travel writer was that she ______.

A. believed travel at that time was very dangerous B. was under an illusion about her health

C. had never displayed much imagination D. had regarded travel as a man’s occupation

2. Sarah thinks Isabella’s trips to Australia were surprising because she had previously ______.

A. preferred an inactive lifestyle B. been frightened of animals

C. never experienced extreme climates D. spent most of her time socializing 3. According to Sarah, Isabella’s letters ______.

A. should have been published earlier B. were based on newspaper articles C. may have exaggerated what she saw. D. failed to provide enough details at times 4. In Sarah’s opinion, Isabella’s personality was unusual because she ______.

A. had rebelled against her father B. was at her best in challenging situations C. only pretended to be courageous D. traveled despite her illnesses

5. According to Sarah, the book in its current form ______.

A. does not make it clear how the letters have been edited B. ought to contain all of the letters Isabella wrote to Henrietta C. fails to include examples of Isabella’s bad experiences D. should be adapted so the style is familiar to readers today Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

B. LEXICO - GRAMMAR (50 points)

Part 1: Choose the word or phrase (A, B, C or D) which best completes each sentence. (20 pts) 1. We ______ up a friendship the very first time we met.

A. struck B. launched C. cropped D. settled

2. Angela’s work was praised for its ______ attention to detail.

A. meticulous B. significant C. subtle D. concentrated 3. Even though they don’t agree with what is happening, they are too ______ to protest.

A. outgoing B. subdued C. quiet D. apathetic

4. The princess's nanny's autobiography really gives the ______ on life among the royals.

A. know-how B. low-down C. look-out D. show-down 5. Eventually the list of candidates for the job was ______ down to three.

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A. narrowed B. lowered C. would D. dropped 6. He’s a tough politician- he knows how to ______ the storm.

A. run down B. keep up C. push back D. ride out 7. The flights are full at the moment, so you'll have to ______.

A. run a stroke of luck B. get a better luck C. be down on your luck D. take pot luck

8. Thousands of newcomers imagine this place to be their El Dorado where they can easily make a ______ start in life.

A. plain B. fresh C. clean D. first

9. The competition he set up for young musicians is another _____ of his life-long support for the arts.

A. exposition B. manifestation C. token D. exhibition 10. A good newspaper story must come right ______ and save the details for later.

A. to date B. to the good C. to the point D. to the bone 11. ______ their heads in his direction, he knew they were interested.

A. Seeing them both turn B. On seeing they both turn

C. When he saw them both to turn D. After seeing them both to have turned 12. He spent his entire life ______ round the world, never settling down anywhere.

A. roaming B. scattering C. scrambling D. transporting 13. Don’t forget to leave your ______ address in case we have to send you mail to the new place.

A. pursuing B. forwarding C. advancing D. following 14. I can never believe John because he is always ______.

A. biting his tongue B. letting his hair down C. twisting my arm D. pulling my leg 15. The new science teacher was popular because she was ______ with her classes.

A. lenient B. conductive C. marked D. ameliorating 16. Several passengers received minor injuries when the train unexpectedly came to a ______.

A. delay B. stand C. brake D. halt

17. “I think we ought to see the rest of the exhibition as quickly as we can, ______ that it closes in half an hour.”

A. granted B. assuming C. given D. knowing

18. Eden decided that election to the local council would provide a _____ to a career in national politics.

A. springboard B. turning-point C. milestone D. highway

19. “When will you be informed of the test result?”~ “Not until Monday, so I’ll be ____ all weekend”

A. at needles and pins B. on needles and pins C. on pins and needles D. at pins and needles

20. We could feel the ______ effect of the oil spill on the fauna and flora of the island years after that.

A. backwash B. backlash C. backlog D. backsliding Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Part 2. Complete the following sentences with the words given in the brackets. You have to change the form of the word. (10 pts)

1. It was a _______ minor accident but tragically, one of the two drivers died. (SEEM)

2. I was a bit _______ by my performance in the first exam, but I decided to make extra efforts in the one left. (MORAL)

3. The report is still _______ but it is already clear that these officers are involved in drug smuggling.

(FRAGMENT)

4. We like Mary. She’s very nice and _______. (LADY)

5. The control centre is deep undergrounded and completely _______ except by a direct hit from a nuclear missile. (DESTROY)

6. Being conscious of one’s posture and gestures when sitting is also _______ to creating the right

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impression on the beholder. (CONDUCT)

7. In Scotland there is greater emphasis on _______ by individual school. (VALUE)

8. Vietnam has depended heavily on foreign _______ organizations to train teachers. (GOVERN) 9. Like their wild cousins, house cats _______ have streamlined bodies, classically shaped skulls, elongated tails and specially evolved teeth and claws. (CHARACTER)

10. These policies could cause severe economic and social _______. (LOCATE) Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Part 3: Identify 10 errors in the following passage and correct them, (0) has been done as an example.

(10 pts) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

The role of the traditional zoo, inheriting from the 19th century, has undergone a dramatic shift. A growing recognition that zoos ought to be in the vanguard of the fight for the devastation of our natural world has begun a zoologic revolution. The change occurred in the 1960s, when the Jersey zoo was set up to breed endangered species. As a result, the breeding of animals in captive has become a complex science, with zoos around the world co-ordinate their efforts to avoid the genetic dangers of in-breeding small populations.

The answer for the question of whether zoos can have much impact on the preservation of endangered species is probably minimal. Zoos do not focus their education efforts on those people in the strongest positions to affect the future of the wildlife being exhibited. For the most part, conservation education is targeted at children and other non-decision makers in a process too slow or too far away to address the extinction crisis which exists now. Furthermore, the efforts of zoos to inform lawmakers and government authorities are usually low-key or un-existent.

Campaigns are more likely to be for an animal exhibit other than for the existence of the animal itself.

Nevertheless, it does not do to address the future from a foundation of pessimism. A vision of the future is embraced in which the human population has leveled off at about 8.8 billion and wherein human effects upon the environment have been tethered and considerable wildlife remain. It certainly will not be as rich or abundant as today’s wildlife, but with substantially diversity, numbers of more or less wild ecosystems, and the zoos’ work, this vision can become reality.

Your answers:

Number Line Mistakes Corrections

0. 1 inheriting inherited

1.

2.

3.

4.

5 6 7 8 9 10

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Part 4. Complete each of the following sentences with a suitable preposition or particle. (10 pts) 1. If you have a grievance ………… the company, please lodge a formal written complaint.

2. I agree with what you said, but I can't go ………… your idea of letting children leave school at 14.

3. When will it dawn ………… you that I am right and you are wrong?

4. No witnesses to the murder have come ………… and the police are struggling to solve the crime.

5. These statistics are too confusing. We need to break them ………… into the four different seasons of the year for a clearer picture.

6. He got ………… his examination fairly well although his health had broken down a few days before it started.

7. Don’t waste time brooding ………… your past failures.

8. He had taken over an old company verging ………… liquidations.

9. Owning to circumstances ………… our control, the flight to Rome has been canceled.

10. Before they hire anyone, they should check ………… background.

Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

C. READING (50 points)

Part 1: For questions 1–10, read the following passage and decide which answer (A, B, C, or D) best fits each gap. Write your answers in corresponding numbered boxes. (10 pts)

Samuel Cunard’s first ship, the Britannia, made its first voyage from Liverpool in England to the US in 1850. In those days there was little choice about (1) _______ of travel. Anyone who wished to go to the US from Britain had to sail across the Atlantic. (2) _______ that, there was no way of getting there. The Britannia was (3) _______ a mail ship, but it also took passengers. On that first (4) _______, as records show, there was a (5) _______ of 63 of them, including Samuel Cunard and his daughter and, (6) _______ for that time, the ship had private bathrooms.

But Samuel Cunard would find it hard to see much similarity between his beloved Britannia and the Cunard company’s most famous liner today, the QE2, named after Queen Elizabeth II of England. The Britannia is (7) _______ to have had two members of staff (8) _______ every passenger. The passengers probably didn’t sleep in cabins as comfortable and with as much space as rooms in a good (9) _______

of hotel, as they do on the QE2 today.

The QE2 (10) _______ on her first voyage across the Atlantic from Southampton on the south coast of England on May 2 1969. Five days later, she arrived in New York to an enthusiastic welcome. Since that day she has carried over one and a half million passengers around the world.

1. A. procedures B. roads C. courses D. means

2. A. Apart from B. Besides C. Instead of D. In lieu of 3. A. at most B. above all C. overall D. vastly 4. A. incident B. occasion C. event D. circumstance

5. A. total B. sum C. number D. quantity

6. A. distinctly B. differently C. extremely D. remarkably 7. A. doubtful B. improbable C. uncertain D. unlikely

8. A. with B. by C. to D. of

9. A. level B. status C. class D. rank

10. A. set off B. went away C. got out D. came along Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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Part 2: For questions 1-10, read the text below and think of the word which best fits each space. Use only one word in each space. (10 pts)

THE SAHARA MARATHON

One of the most amazing marathon races in the world is the Marathon of the Sands. It takes place every April in the Sahara Desert in the south of Morocco, a part of the world where temperatures can (1) ________ fifty degrees centigrade. The standard length of a marathon is 42.5 kilometres but

this

one is 240 kilometres long and takes seven days to complete. It began in 1986 and now attracts about two hundred runners, the majority of (2) ________ ages range from seventeen to forty-seven. About half of them come from France and the rest from all over the world. From Britain it costs £2,500 to enter, which includes return air fares. The race is rapidly becoming more and more popular (3) ________, or perhaps because of, the harsh conditions that runners must endure. They have to carry food and anything else they need for seven days in a rucksack (4) ________ no more than twelve kilograms. (5) ________ this, they are given a litre and a half of water every ten kilometres. Incredibly, nearly (6) ________ the runners finish the course. One man, Ibrahim El Journal, took part in (7) ________ race from 1986 to 2004. Runners (8) ________ suffer terrible physical hardships. Sometimes they lose toenails and skin peels (9) ________ their feet. However, doctors are always on hand to deal with minor injuries and to make sure that runners do not push (10) ________ too far.

Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Part 3: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. (10 pts)

There is one kind of pain for which nobody has yet found a cure – the pain that comes from the ending of a relationship. The relationship could be a marriage, a love affair or a deep friendship, in fact, any strong emotional tie between people. Such a relationship may come to an abrupt but premeditated end or it may simply fade away slowly as people and circumstances change. You may be the one to

“break it off”, with a short note or a brief phone call. Or you may be on the receiving end, like the soldier who dreads getting a “Dear John” letter from a girlfriend who has got tired of waiting. But however it ended and whoever decided to end it, the pain is equally hard to bear. It is a sort of death, and it requires the same period of mourning, the same time for grief.

Although there is no cure for grief, we cannot help looking for one, to ease the pain and to make us forget our tears. We seek refuge in other relationships, we keep ourselves busy with work, we try to immerse ourselves in our hobbies. Perhaps we start to drink more than we should to drown our sorrows or we follow the conventional advice and join a club or society. But these things only relieve the symptoms of the illness, they cannot cure for it. Moreover, we are always in a hurry to get rid of our grief. It is as if we were ashamed of it. We feel that we should be able to “pull ourselves together”. We try to convince ourselves, as we bite on the pillow, that we are much too old to be crying. Some people bury their grief deep inside themselves, so that nobody will guess what they are going through. Others seek relief by pouring their hearts out to their friends, or to anyone else who can offer a sympathetic shoulder to cry on. But after a while, even our friends start to show their impatience, and suggest with their reproachful glances that it is about time we stopped crying. They, too, are in a hurry for the thing to be over.

It is not easy to explain why we adopt this attitude to emotional pain, when we would never expect anyone to overcome physical pain simply by an effort of will power. Part of the answer must lie in the nature of grief itself. When the love affair dies, you cannot believe that you will ever find another person to replace the one who has gone so completely out of your life. Even after many, many months, when you think that you have begun to learn to live without your lost love, something-a familiar place, a snatch of music, a whiff of perfume- will suddenly bring the bitter – sweet memories flooding back. You choke back the tears and the desperate, almost angry, feeling that you are no better now than the day the affair ended.

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And yet, grief is like an illness that must run its course. Memories do fade eventually, a healing skin does start to grow over the wound, the intervals between sudden glimpses of the love you have lost do get longer. Bit by bit, life resumes the normal flow. Such is the complexity of human nature that we can even start to feel guilty as these things start to happen, as if it were an insult to our lost love that we can begin to forget at all.

The important thing to admit about grief, then, is that it will take its time. By trying to convince ourselves that it ought to be over sooner, we create an additional tension which can only make things worse. People who have gone through the agony of a broken relationship – and there are few who have not- agree that time is the “greater healer”. How much time is needed will vary from person to person, but psychiatrists have “a rule of thumb”: grief will last as long as the original relationship lasted. The sad thing is that, when the breakdown occurs, we can only stumble over the stories beneath our feet. It is dark ahead, and you will feel painfully many times before we begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

1. Psychiatrists tell you that grief will last as long as the original relationship. This calculation is _____.

A. based on a deep understanding of human nature B. generally true but with many exceptions

C. the result of scientific research D. no more than a hopeful guesses

2. Relationships often come to an end because ______.

A. people do not realize the pain they can cause B. very few people really know how to love C. the feeling of the people were not very deep D. people do not always stay the same

3. You tell your friends about your unhappiness because ______.

A. you want them to feel sorry for you B. you hope it will make you feel better

C. you want them to hear the story from you

D. you feel sure that they have had similar experiences

4. If you seek advice on what to do about a broken relationship, you will probably be told to ______.

A. keep busy at work B. find someone else C. pull yourself together (use your will power) D. join a club

5. When your friends get tired of listening to you they will ______.

A. tell you to pull yourself together B. try to avoid your company

C. show by their expressions that they have had enough D. help you to get over your grief

6. Often we are ashamed when we cry because ______.

A. only children and babies cry B. we are worried about what others will think of us

C. we do not expect our unhappiness to last so long D. we think it is a childish thing to do

7. Memories continue to upset you, and this makes you feel that you ______.

A. will never get over your grief B. have no will power

C. are utterly alone D. have made no progress at all 8. If we try to recover too quickly from grief, we shall make ourselves ______.

A. nervous B. tense C. ill D. unpopular

9. We are upset by reminders of our lost love because they come so ______.

A. unexpectedly B. rapidly C. frequently D. rarely 10. One way to get over a broken relationship is to ______.

A. try to forget the other person B. write a “Dear John” letter C. make a brief phone call D. form new relationships

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Your answers:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Part 4. Read the following passage and do the tasks that follow. (20 pts)

THE LITTLE ICE AGE

A. This book will provide a detailed examination of the Little Ice Age and other climatic shifts, but, before I embark on that, let me provide a historical context. We tend to think of climate - as opposed to weather - as something unchanging, yet humanity has been at the mercy of climate change for its entire existence, with at least eight glacial episodes in the past 730,000 years. Our ancestors adapted to the universal but irregular global warming since the end of the last great Ice Age, around 10,000 years ago, with dazzling opportunism. They developed strategies for surviving harsh drought cycles, decades of heavy rainfall or unaccustomed cold; adopted agriculture and stock-raising, which revolutionized human life; and founded the world's first pre-industrial civilizations in Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Americas.

But the price of sudden climate change, in famine, disease and suffering, was often high.

B. The Little Ice Age lasted from roughly 1300 until the middle of the nineteenth century. Only two centuries ago, Europe experienced a cycle of bitterly cold winters; mountain glaciers in the Swiss Alps were the lowest in recorded memory, and pack ice surrounded Iceland for much of the year. The climatic events of the Little Ice Age did more than help shape the modern world. They are the deeply important context for the current unprecedented global warming. The Little Ice Age was far from a deep freeze, however; rather an irregular seesaw of rapid climatic shifts, few lasting more than a quarter-century, driven by complex and still little understood interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. The seesaw brought cycles of intensely cold winters and easterly winds, then switched abruptly to years of heavy spring and early summer rains, mild winters, and frequent Atlantic storms, or to periods of droughts, light northeasterly winds, and summer heat waves.

C. Reconstructing the climate changes of the past is extremely difficult, because systematic weather observations began only a few centuries ago, in Europe and North America. Records from India and tropical Africa are even more recent. For the time before records began, we have only 'proxy records' reconstructed largely from tree rings and ice cores, supplemented by a few incomplete written accounts.

We now have hundreds of tree-ring records from throughout the northern hemisphere, and many from south of the equator, too, amplified with a growing body of temperature data from ice cores drilled in Antarctica, Greenland, the Peruvian Andes, and other locations. We are close to a knowledge of annual summer and winter temperature variations over much of the northern hemisphere going back 600 years.

D. This book is a narrative history of climatic shifts during the past ten centuries, and some of the ways in which people in Europe adapted to them. Part One describes the Medieval Warm Period, roughly 900 to 1200. During these three centuries, Norse voyagers from Northern Europe explored northern seas, settled Greenland, and visited North America. It was not a time of uniform warmth, for then, as always since the Great Ice Age, there were constant shifts in rainfall and temperature. Mean European temperatures were about the same as today, perhaps slightly cooler.

E. It is known that the Little Ice Age cooling began in Greenland and the Arctic in about 1200. As the Arctic ice pack spread southward, Norse voyages to the west were rerouted into the open Atlantic, then ended altogether. Storminess increased in the North Atlantic and North Sea. Colder, much wetter weather descended on Europe between 1315 and 1319, when thousands perished in a continent-wide famine. By 1400, the weather had become decidedly more unpredictable and stormier, with sudden shifts and lower temperatures that culminated in the cold decades of the late sixteenth century. Fish were a vital commodity in growing towns and cities, where food supplies were a constant concern. Dried cod

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and herring were already the staples of the European fish trade, but changes in water temperatures forced fishing fleets to work further offshore. The Basques, Dutch, and English developed the first offshore fishing boats adapted to a colder and stormier Atlantic. A gradual agricultural revolution in northern Europe stemmed from concerns over food supplies at a time of rising populations. The revolution involved intensive commercial farming and the growing of animal fodder on land not previously used for crops. The increased productivity from farmland made some countries self-sufficient in grain and livestock and offered effective protection against famine.

F. Global temperatures began to rise slowly after 1850, with the beginning of the Modern Warm Period.

There was a vast migration from Europe by land-hungry farmers and others, to which the famine caused by the Irish potato blight contributed, to North America, Australia, New Zealand, and southern Africa.

Millions of hectares of forest and woodland fell before the newcomers' axes between 1850 and 1890, as intensive European farming methods expanded across the world. The unprecedented land clearance released vast quantities of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, triggering for the first time humanly caused global warming. Temperatures climbed more rapidly in the twentieth century as the use of fossil fuels proliferated and greenhouse gas levels continued to soar. The rise has been even steeper since the early 1980s. The Little Ice Age has given way to a new climatic regime, marked by prolonged and steady warming. At the same time, extreme weather events like Category 5 hurricanes are becoming more frequent.

Question 1-5 (10 pts)

The passage has six sections, A-F. Choose the correct heading for each section from the list of headings below. Write the correct number, i-ix, in boxes 1-5. Three of the headings do not fit.

List of headings

(i). Predicting climatic changes

(ii). The prevalence of the Little Ice Age today (iii). How cities contribute to climate change (iv). Human impact on the climate

(v). How past climatic conditions can be determined (vi). A growing need for weather records

(vii). A study covering a thousand years

(viii). People have always responded to climate change (ix). Enough food at last

Example : Paragraph F ___iv____

1. Paragraph A _________

2. Paragraph B _________

3. Paragraph C _________

4. Paragraph D _________

5. Paragraph E _________

Your answers

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

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Question 6 – 10 (5 pts)

Complete the summary using the list of words, A—1, below.

Write the correct letter, A—I, in boxes 6-10 on your answer sheet.

A. climatic shifts B. ice cores C. tree rings

D. glaciers E. interactions F. weather observations G. heat waves H. storms I. written accounts

Weather during the Little Ice Age

Documentation of past weather condition is limited: our main sources of knowledge of conditions in the distant past are (6) ______ and (7) ______. We can deduce that the Little Ice Age was a time of (8) ______, rather than of consistent freezing. Within it there were some periods of very cold winters, others of (9) ______ and heavy rain, and yet others that saw (10) ______ with no rain at all.

Your answers:

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Question 11-15 (5 pts). Classify the following events as occurring during the:

A. Medieval Warm Period B. Little Ice Age

C. Modem Warm Period

11. Many Europeans started farming abroad in __________.

12. The cutting down of trees began to affect the climate during ___________.

13. In __________, Europeans discovered other lands.

14. Changes took place in fishing patterns in __________.

15. Global temperature began to rise slowly with the beginning of __________.

Your answers:

11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

D. WRITING (60 pts)

Part 1: Read the following extract and use your own words to summarize it. Your summary should be about 80 words long. You MUST NOT copy the original. (10 points)

It is the human factor that contributes to the absolute majority of road accidents which involve the tremendous toll of fatalities each year. Other, less decisive, causes are vehicle malfunctions or road shortcomings. Speeding motorists are notorious for failing to give way at junctions, misjudging the situation on the road or being unable to accurately estimate the distance while overtaking the ‘snail- pacers’ ahead. Drinkers who settle behind the wheel after one glass or two may running the risk of causing a tragedy through their impaired perception, which is not so rare a case, again.

Unfortunately, it is much simpler to introduce the necessary alterations in the traffic system than change the behavioral patterns of drivers. There are voices that more severe disciplinary resolutions ought to be put into practice if the vehicle users are to benefit from greater security on the road. The idea of producing safe road users through pre-school parental instruction or through incorporating the safety regulations into the school curriculum has been widely acclaimed in many communities and is expected to yield the required results as the first step in bettering the qualifications of the future drivers and acquainting them with the potential hazards that may arise on route.

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Part 2: Graph describing (20 pts)

The graph below shows predictions about the number of people who will study three major world languages between 2020 and 2030.

Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.Write a report of about 150 words.

Students of three world languages, 2020 - 2030

0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800

2020 2022 2024 2026 2028 2030 year

estimated number of students (millions)

English Spanish Mandarin

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Part 3. Essay writing (30 pts)

Some people believe that learning depends not upon the personality or methodology of the teacher, but rather on the student's attitude to his or her own learning.

To what extent would you support or reject this idea? Give reasons for your answer and include any relevant examples from your own knowledge or experience. Write at least 250 words.

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