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Beginning Japanese for Professionals: Book 1

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Nguyễn Gia Hào

Academic year: 2023

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All audio files have corresponding transcripts, which can be found in the corresponding exercise or at the end of the corresponding chapter. Emiko Konomi received her PhD in Linguistics from Cornell University and was on the faculty of the School of Business Administration at Portland State. This textbook was originally written for the first semester (ten weeks) of the introductory Japanese course in the graduate program of the Master of International Management in the School of Business Administration at Portland State University.

So what can we expect our students to be able to do at the end of the program. You should only refer to the written scripts when you need help with specific parts of the audio. Romanization is not intended to be an exact representation of Japanese sounds, but rather just a reminder of the sounds you hear when listening to your instructor or the audio recordings.

By answering the grammar review questions at the end of each lesson, you will self-assess your understanding of the grammar before moving on to the next lesson. At the end of the day, it doesn't matter much if you can't verbally respond to a native speaker in a culturally appropriate way, no matter how well you can answer grammar questions or recite vocabulary in isolation.

It can also be combined with arigatou gozaimasu ('thank you very much') or sumimasen ('I'm very sorry'). Hai means 'that's right', 'present' (in roll call) or 'here you are' (I'm teaching something). Itadakimasu literally means "I will humbly accept" and is used before eating or receiving a gift.

「いってきます」は家を出るときや用事で会社を出るときに使います。答え:ぐれーさんですか。お会いできて嬉しいです。まずは自分で日本語で言って、音声でモデルの反応を聞いてください。

あなたが応募したばかりの仕事に対する「よろしくお願いします」に相当する日本語は何ですか。キュー: グレー。答え: グレイさん?あなたに会えて光栄でした。

Table 1.  Syllables in Japanese
Table 1. Syllables in Japanese

New to the Office

Unlike English, where a subject is required, subject and object are usually not mentioned in Japanese if understood from the context. Smith simply says Wakarimasu has in order to find out if a colleague understands the report. The non-past refers to an act that is regularly performed or will be performed in the future.

Hai means 'what you said is correct' whether the sentence is affirmative or negative. Iie means 'what you said is incorrect' whether the sentence is affirmative or negative. It helps create the culturally significant impression that you and the addressee share the same feeling or opinion.

When it's used with interrogative intonation, you're checking to see if it's yours. the assumption is actually correct. Adverbs appear before the verb in a Japanese sentence and indicate how much, how often, or in what way something happens.

As seen in Dialogue 1 above, the subject, object, and other elements are usually not explicitly mentioned in Japanese when they are clear from the context. When the sentence elements are not in the usual order above, the element moved forward has more focus. The second sentence is often left unsaid because it is obvious from the context or because the speaker is reluctant to mention it for some reason.

Smith probably wanted to sound less abrupt and is inviting comments from other speakers. The participle wa follows nouns and indicates a contrast between that noun under discussion and other possibilities. When the particle wa is attached to a noun with an interrogative intonation, it means 'how about X?' as in the dialogue above.

The particle mo means 'also' or 'also' with an affirmative verb and '(n)either' with a negative verb.

For example, as explained in GN 1-3-1, it is polite to just say chotto when declining an invitation or request, instead of saying no. The effort to avoid an unpleasant or awkward situation is evident in the frequent use of chotto in Japanese communication. When participating in a Japanese conversation, you are expected to give frequent feedback and show that you are engaged.

Unlike English, where the pronoun you is used for the addressee in most cases, there are many ways to address and refer to others in Japanese. Unlike its English equivalent, anatta has very limited use, usually for anonymous addressers, and is inappropriate if you know the person's name or title. Remember that the subject is not mentioned in Japanese when it is clearly understood from the context.

Overuse of personal reference is one of the most common mistakes made by foreigners whose native language requires them in a sentence. It goes without saying that when correcting someone, you must first make sure you are in a position to do it, and then do it properly.

キュー: 食べませんか?答え:はい、まったく食べません。 答え:はい、それは見えますが、それは見えません。回答:私はそうしますが、本多さんはそうしません。

キュー: なるほど。回答: ああ、私も毎日見ています。キュー: なるほど。回答: ああ、私も毎日やってます。キュー: 行きたいですか?回答: はい、そうします。本田さんも行きませんか?

キュー: そうします。回答: ああ、そうです。じゃあ、私も行くよ… キュー: 練習するか?返答: そうですね、少し練習してみませんか?

Table 2.  Affirmative forms of verbs in both past and non-past
Table 2. Affirmative forms of verbs in both past and non-past

Meeting People

X ではありませんでしたか。答え: フランス語ですか?いいえ、わかりません。

Table 3. Conjucation of non-past and past-forms of -desu in the affirmative and negative
Table 3. Conjucation of non-past and past-forms of -desu in the affirmative and negative

Settling Down

複数の形容詞やその他の修飾要素を組み合わせて名詞句を拡張することができます。いいえ、甘利です。 答え: いいえ、あまり安くありません。つまり、甘利です。

2 つ以上の例を挙げることはできますが、3 つまたは 4 つ以上あることはまれです。

Cue: みんな年寄りですよね?答え: 一番古いのはどれですか?キュー: かわいいですか?応答: はい、とてもきれいなアパートです 手がかり: 椅子と机はありますか?回答: いいえ、椅子や机はありません。 。

A: いいえ、英語もスペイン語もわかりません。

Table 4.  Examples of affirmative and negative non-past types of verb, noun, and adjective sentences in Japanese
Table 4. Examples of affirmative and negative non-past types of verb, noun, and adjective sentences in Japanese

Project Team

ここでは、宿題 (「宿題がある」) だけではなく、文全体 (「宿題がある」) に焦点が当てられています。 1) 少し休憩を取る、2) 遅いので家に帰る、3) もう少し頑張ってみることを提案します。ラーメン食べたいけど…。

Unlike English forms like "would you" or "would you like," which can be used to invite someone to do something, ~tai forms are not generally used as invitations or suggestions in Japanese. Answer: That is, kore wa mitai desu kedo, No, I want to see this, are wa mitaku nai desu. Answer: That is, kore wa yomitai desu kedo, No, I want to read this, are wa yomitaku nai desu.

答え: はい、使用しないので購入しません。

Table 14. Affirmative, negative, past and non-past forms of the verb tabemasu.
Table 14. Affirmative, negative, past and non-past forms of the verb tabemasu.

Hình ảnh

Table 1.  Syllables in Japanese
Table 2.  Affirmative forms of verbs in both past and non-past
Table 3. Conjucation of non-past and past-forms of -desu in the affirmative and negative
Table 4.  Examples of affirmative and negative non-past types of verb, noun, and adjective sentences in Japanese
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