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Thư viện số Văn Lang: Biodiversity Conservation and Phylogenetic Systematics: Preserving our evolutionary heritage in an extinction crisis

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Nguyễn Gia Hào

Academic year: 2023

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The most commonly used phylogenetic measure is Faith's phylogenetic diversity (PD) (Faith 1992), which is defined as the sum of the branch lengths of a phylogenetic tree that connects all species in the target assemblage. The species richness of a collection is a simple count of the number of species present. The parameter q determines the sensitivity of the measure to the relative frequencies of the species.

Here, Li and he are defined in Eq. 2b) and T is the age of the root node of the tree. When T is chosen as the age of the root node, there is a simple relation between the phylogenetic entropy HP (Allen et al. 2009) and the 1D measure T( ):. 4c). As suggested in Chiu et al. 2014), other time perspectives can be chosen, such as T = the age of the node at which the group of interest diverges from the rest of the species.

Another choice is the time of the most recent common ancestor of all taxa alive today. The parameter q gives the sensitivity of the two measures to present-day species relative abundances.

Fig. 1 (a) A hypothetical ultrametric rooted phylogenetic tree with four species. Three different  slices corresponding to three different times are shown
Fig. 1 (a) A hypothetical ultrametric rooted phylogenetic tree with four species. Three different slices corresponding to three different times are shown

Decomposition of Phylogenetic Diversity Measures

Gamma diversity is the effective number of equally abundant and equally distinct lineages all of branch length T in the pooled pool. The alpha formula then reduces to a generalized average of local diversities with the following property: if all groups have the same diversity X, the alpha diversity is also X (Jost 2007). 2014) proved that the phylogenetic range Hill number (eqs. 7a and 7b) is always greater than or equal to the phylogenetic alpha Hill number (eqs. 8a .. and 8b) for all q ≥ 0, regardless of species abundances and structures of trees.

When N assemblages are identical in species identities and species abundances, then qD Tb( )=1 for each T. The measure qD Tb( ) thus defines the effective number of fully phylogenetically distinct assemblages in the interval [−T, 0 ]. When all lineages in the pooled group are completely distinct (no lineages in common) in the interval [−T, 0], the phylogenetic alpha, beta, and gamma Hill numbers are reduced to those based on ordinary Hill numbers.

Parallel decomposition can be done for the phylogenetic diversity qPD(T), and we summarize the following relations: qPD Tg( )= qD Tg( )´T and. Thus, it is sufficient to focus only on the measurement qD Tb( ), which for simplicity will be referred to as the phylogenetic beta diversity or beta component. Then the beta diversity is formed by taking their ratio replication-invariant (Chiu et al. 2014).

Thus, when we merge similar subfamilies, such as merging subfamilies of the same age, the beta diversity remains unchanged by merging the subfamilies if all subfamilies show the same beta diversity (“consistency in aggregation”). We now give the phylogenetic beta diversities for the special cases of q = 0, 1 and 2. a) If q = 0, we have 0D Tb( )=L Tg( )/L Ta( ), where Lγ(T) stands for the total branch length of the aggregated tree (the gamma component of Faith's PD) and La(T) indicates the average length of individual trees (the alpha component of Faith's PD). In the special case of z+k =1, z++ =N this phylogenetic beta diversity of order 2 can be linked to quadratic entropy axis.

The above formula is also applicable to non-ultrametric trees by replacing all T by T, the average branch length in the pooled set; see Chiu et al.

Normalized Phylogenetic Similarity Measures

Because range is N dependent, phylogenetic beta diversity cannot be used to compare phylogenetic differentiation between assemblages in multiple regions with different numbers of assemblages. This class of similarity measures extends the CqN overlap measure from Chao et al. The corresponding differentiation measure 1-CqN( )T quantifies the effective mean proportion of unshared branches in an individual set. 1a) For q = 0, this measure of similarity is called the “phylo-Sørensen”.

-assemblage overlap measure because for N = 2 it reduces to measure PhyloSør (phylo-Sørensen) developed by Bryant et al. 1b). For q = 1, this measure C1N( )T is called the "phylo-Horn" N-assembly overlap measure because it extends the Horn (1966) two-assembly measure to incorporate phylogenies for N assemblies. 1c). For q = 2, C2N( )T is called the "phylo-Morisita-Horn" N-assembly similarity measure because it extends the Morisita-Horn measure (Morisita 1959) to incorporate phylogenies for N assemblies.

The differentiation measure 1-C2N( )T when the species importance measure is relative abundances, reduces to the measure used by de Bello et al. The expression above shows that the similarity index C2N( )T, as in all other abundance-sensitive similarity measures, is unity if and only if zij =zik (i.e., species importance measures are identical for any node i in the branch set and for any two assemblages j and k). This class of metrics quantifies the effective ratio of shared branches in the merged assembly.

The corresponding differentiation measure 1-UqN( )T determines the average effective percentage of non-shared branches in the merged set. 2a) For q = 0, this measure is called the N "phylo-Jaccard" clustering measure because for N = 2 the 1-U T02( ) measure reduces to the Jaccard-type UniFrac measure developed by Lozupone and Knight (2005) and the dissimilarity PD developed by Faith et al. This measure is linear in the ratio of regional phylogenetic diversity contained in a typical group. 3b). This measure linearly in phylogenetic beta diversity and the corresponding differentiation measure éëqD Tb( )-1ùû/(N-1) quantifies the relative degree of branch turnover per group. 4b) For q = 1, this measure does not reduce to the "phylo-Horn" overlap measure.

After proper normalizations, the two measures lead to the same four classes of normalized similarity and differentiation measures as those obtained from the phylogenetic beta diversity.

Table 1Two major classes of phylogenetic similarity measures based on the transformations of phylogenetic beta diversity when species importance measures  are incidences (for q = 0), relative abundances or absolute abundance (for q = 1 and 2)
Table 1Two major classes of phylogenetic similarity measures based on the transformations of phylogenetic beta diversity when species importance measures are incidences (for q = 0), relative abundances or absolute abundance (for q = 1 and 2)

An Example

That is, a consensus can be reached on measures of phylogenetic similarity and differentiation, including phylogenetic generalizations of the clustering N of the classic Jaccard, Sørensen, Horn, and Morisita-Horn measures, regardless of whether you prefer multiplicative or additive decompositions. When species/lineage abundance is subtracted (q = 0 in the left panels of Fig. 4b), both lineage richness (based on the 0D T( )) measure and total branch length (based on the 0PD(T) measure), i.e. ie Faith's PD) display the expected order: Decade I > Decade II > Decade III. When species/lineage abundances are counted (i.e. q = 1 and 2 in Fig. 4b), the profiles for Decade I and II cross because the Decade II group has even more abundant species than the Decade I group (see first type of profiles for T = 0 and Fig. 3a, b).

Note that if the time depth exceeds 6 million years (including root age), then all abundance-sensitive phylogenetic measures for the three assemblages are very close, as most of the dominant species started to diverge around 6 million years (Fig. .3b ). This also explains the proximity of the three profiles in the first type of profile for T = 7.9 Myr (the right panel in Fig. 4a). To illustrate the phylogenetic differentiation between assemblages, we focus on measuring the phylogenetic differentiation between two decades for three pairs (i.e., Decades I vs. II, Decades I vs.

To see how phylogenetic differentiation measures vary with time perspective q and order T, we show two types of profiles for each of the two differentiation measures 1-CqN()T and 1-UqN()T in Figs. When the abundance of species/lineages decreases (q = 0), the differences between the measures of differentiation of the three pairs of assemblages are not apparent, as shown in the two left panels in Fig. III, and the differentiation between the last two decades (Decade II vs. III) is much lower than either of the other two pairs.

3b we see that most of the dominant and isolated species began to diverge about 6 million years ago. Thus, the two differentiation profiles for q = 1 and 2 start to decrease strongly around 6 Myr, especially for the order q = 2. Since the abundances of nodes near the roots (where the differentiation values ​​are close to zero) are relatively high and dominate the entire tree, all values ​​of phylogenetic differentiation measures for T = 7.9 Myr (the first type of profile for T = 7.9 Myr in the right panel of Figure 5) significantly lower than their corresponding non-phylogenetic differentiation measure by comparing the two numbers (T = 0 and T = 7.9 Myr) in each row fig.

The two types of profiles (in Figs. 5a,b and 6a,b) demonstrate that the two measures of differentiation 1-CqN()T and 1-UqN()T can include changes in both tree structure and lineage abundance .

Fig. 3 (a) The phylogenetic tree of 52 rockfish species of the genus Sebastes (Hyde and Vetter  2007) and the species relative abundances in three assemblages: 1980s (Decade I), 1990s (Decade  II) and 2000s (Decade III)
Fig. 3 (a) The phylogenetic tree of 52 rockfish species of the genus Sebastes (Hyde and Vetter 2007) and the species relative abundances in three assemblages: 1980s (Decade I), 1990s (Decade II) and 2000s (Decade III)

Conclusion

In summary, our phylogenetic diversity measures have shown a significant loss of species, lineages and evolutionary history in the redfish assemblage over time due to fishing pressure, and our phylogenetic differentiation measures show a pronounced change in species/lineage composition after 1990. All numerical results before - sent in section “An example” of this chapter were obtained by extending the R scripts from Pavoine et al. 2009, their appendix S1) with mound numbers and our phylogenetic measurements. Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.5 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/) which prohibits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction on any medium, provided that the original author(s) and source are credited.

The images or other third-party material in this chapter are included in the work's Creative Commons license, unless otherwise noted in the credit line; if such material is not included in the work's Creative Commons license and the action in question is not permitted by statutory regulation, users must obtain permission from the licensee to duplicate, adapt or reproduce the material.

Faith DP, Richards ZT (2012) The impacts of climate change on the tree of life: changes in phylogenetic diversity illustrated for acropora corals. Faith DP, Lozupone CA, Nipperess D, Knight R (2009) The cladistic basis for the phylogenetic diversity (PD) measure links evolutionary traits to environmental gradients and supports broad applications of the "phylogenetic beta diversity" framework of microbial ecology. Ferrier S, Manion G, Elith J, Richardson K (2007) Using generalized inequality modeling to analyze and predict patterns of beta diversity in the assessment of regional biodiversity.

Keylock C (2005) Simpson diversity and the Shannon-Wiener index as special cases of a generalized entropy.

Hình ảnh

Fig. 1 (a) A hypothetical ultrametric rooted phylogenetic tree with four species. Three different  slices corresponding to three different times are shown
Fig. 2  Replication Principle for two completely phylogenetically distinct assemblages with  totally different structures
Table 1Two major classes of phylogenetic similarity measures based on the transformations of phylogenetic beta diversity when species importance measures  are incidences (for q = 0), relative abundances or absolute abundance (for q = 1 and 2)
Fig. 3 (a) The phylogenetic tree of 52 rockfish species of the genus Sebastes (Hyde and Vetter  2007) and the species relative abundances in three assemblages: 1980s (Decade I), 1990s (Decade  II) and 2000s (Decade III)
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