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International economics: third edition

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Nguyễn Gia Hào

Academic year: 2023

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In February 2004, the first quote at the beginning of this chapter appeared in the President's Economic Report. Since then, the surpluses of the United Kingdom and the United States have been comparable. Within some parts of the Eurozone (as elsewhere), private sector borrowers were embroiled in a credit-fueled boom.

A drop in price due to the removal of the import quota is exactly what we predict from theory, as we move.

16  Figure 8-12 and the welfare estimates in the following paragraphs are from James Harrigan and Geoffrey  Barrows, 2009, “Testing the Theory of Trade Policy: Evidence from the Abrupt End of the Multifi bre  Arrangement,” The Review of Economics and Statis
16 Figure 8-12 and the welfare estimates in the following paragraphs are from James Harrigan and Geoffrey Barrows, 2009, “Testing the Theory of Trade Policy: Evidence from the Abrupt End of the Multifi bre Arrangement,” The Review of Economics and Statis

Introduction to International Trade

Patterns of International Trade

New Explanations for International Trade

International Trade Policies

Brief Contents

Introduction to International Macroeconomics

Exchange Rates

The Balance of Payments

Applications and Policy Issues

Contents

  • Gains and Losses from Trade in the Specific-Factors Model 59
  • Trade and Resources: The Heckscher-Ohlin Model 87
  • Movement of Labor and Capital Between Countries 123
  • Increasing Returns to Scale and Monopolistic Competition 165
  • Offshoring of Goods and Services 197
  • Import Tariffs and Quotas Under Perfect Competition 233
  • PART 4
  • Import Tariffs and Quotas Under Imperfect Competition 279
  • Export Subsidies in Agriculture and High- Technology Industries 327
  • International Agreements: Trade, Labor, and the Environment 367
  • The Global Macroeconomy 411 1 Foreign Exchange: Currencies and Crises 412
  • Introduction to Exchange Rates and the Foreign Exchange Market 435
  • Exchange Rates I: The Monetary Approach in the Long Run 473
  • Exchange Rates II: The Asset Approach in the Short Run 521
  • National and International Accounts: Income, Wealth, and the Balance of Payments 567
  • Balance of Payments I: The Gains from Financial Globalization 609
  • Balance of Payments II: Output, Exchange Rates, and Macroeconomic Policies in the Short Run 663
  • Fixed Versus Floating: International Monetary Experience 715
  • Exchange Rate Crises: How Pegs Work and How They Break 757
  • The Euro 811 1 The Economics of the Euro 814
  • Topics in International Macroeconomics 859 1 Exchange Rates in the Long Run: Deviations from Purchasing

1 Movement of labor between countries: Migration 125 Effects of immigration in the short term: Specific factors. Other Effects of Immigration in the Short Run 133 Effects of Immigration in the Long Run 134 Rybczynski Theorem 139. 1 Exchange Rates and Prices in the Long Run: Purchasing Power Parity and Goods Market Equilibrium 474.

2 Money, prices and exchange rates in the long run: money market equilibrium in a simple model 486.

Features

With this book, we have expanded the vision of international economics to include the latest theories and events in today's world. Policy analysis reflected the concerns of the time, be it strategic trade policy or the Bretton Woods system. Covering new and expanding ground is part of the challenge and excitement of teaching and learning twenty-first century international economics.

Many of the new topics are far removed from conventional textbook treatments and have in the past been overlooked in lectures or learned through supplementary readings.

New in the Third Edition

Topics and Approaches

The Arrangement of Topics: International Trade Part 1: Introduction to International Trade

Patterns of International Trade

New Explanations for International Trade

International Trade Policies

The Arrangement of Topics: International Macroeconomics Part 5 (Part 1 in International Macroeconomics): Introduction to

Part 2): Exchange Rates

We cover the long run before the short run because long run expectations are assumed to be recognized in the short run model. The chapter concludes with a discussion of nominal anchors and their relation to monetary and exchange rate regimes. Uncovered interest parity, first introduced in Chapter 13 (Chapter 2), is the centerpiece of the asset approach, and the expected future exchange rate is assumed to be given by the long-run model.

We show how all the building blocks of the money and asset approach fit together into a complete theory of exchange rate determination.

Part 3): The Balance of Payments

It concludes with interest rate parity conditions, which are then dealt with in more detail in chapter 15 (chapter 4). We first develop a simple monetary model (the quantity theory) and then look at the standard monetary model, the Fisher effect and real interest rate parity. Finally, we explain how the complete theory works for solid as well as liquid regimes, and demonstrate the trilemma.

This arrangement of topics allows a smooth transition from some key definitions in Chapter 16 (Chapter 5) to their application at the beginning of Chapter 17 (Chapter 6), a connection that would be impossible if the balance of payments chapter were to be set before coverage. of exchange rates.

Part 4) Applications and Policy Issues

A semester-long course in international trade (say, 15 weeks) would begin in Chapter 1, but for a shorter quarter-term course (say, 10 weeks), we suggest skipping Chapter 1 and going straight to the Ricardian model. (Chapter 2). The new approaches to international trade covered in Chapters 6 (economies of scale and imperfect competition) and 7 (offshoring) can be learned independently of each other. A quarter course in international trade may not have time for both chapters.) The last four chapters in international trade deal with trade policy. A semester course in international macroeconomics (say, 15 weeks) would begin at Chapter 12 in the combined edition (Chapter 1 in the split edition of International Macroeconomics), but for a shorter trimester course (say, 10 weeks) , we recommend skipping Chapter 12 (Chapter 1) and going directly to the foreign exchange market presented in Chapter 13 (Chapter 2).

It then moves on to chapters 2 to 6, the basic chapters on trade, followed by two chapters on tariffs and quotas under perfect competition and under imperfect competition.

Supplements and Media

Students can search, highlight and bookmark, making it easier to study and access key content. In addition, the e-book will also contain links to all research articles and data cited in the text. Students can only be in two places in LaunchPad – either viewing the homepage of their assigned content or working on completing their assignments.

It's the only solution built for educators, by educators—with continuous product improvements made through live classroom testing and faculty feedback.

Acknowledgments

Cloud State University Raymond Riezman—University of Iowa Helen Roberts—University of Illinois, Chicago Mari L. Menzie Chinn—University of Wisconsin, Madison Carl Davidson—Michigan State University Ann Davis—Marist College.

APPLICATION

HEADLINES

The many differences between European countries and between Europe and the United States partly explain the trade between them. There is a proposal to extend free trade with the United States to many of the other countries bordering the Pacific Ocean in the Trans-Pacific Partnership. There is also a proposal for a free trade area between the US and the EU in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.

The United Kingdom achieved the highest ratio of trade to GDP (30%), while Australia, Canada and the average of European countries all exceeded 20% at their peaks (shown in 1913 or 1920). The high tariffs led to a dramatic decline in world trade in the interwar period, at great cost to the United States and the world economy. However, after World War I, the average tariff rose sharply due to the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act in the United States and the reaction by.

It is therefore no surprise that immigration policy is a frequent topic of debate in the United States. In the 1980s and 1990s, many Japanese car companies opened factories in the United States to avoid the United States. Today, more Japanese cars are built in the United States than are imported from Japan.

FDI in the Americas There are also significant amounts of FDI in Figure 1-6 among the United States, Canada, and Latin America. Why are Austria and Canada higher than Mexico in their sales of snowboards to the United States.

in 2010. Figure 1-1(b) shows that the export share of these same categories also fell  from about 80% to 40% over that time.
in 2010. Figure 1-1(b) shows that the export share of these same categories also fell from about 80% to 40% over that time.

SIDE BAR

Suppose there are L-- = 25 employees in the home country (the bar above the letter L indicates that we assume that the amount of labor in Home remains constant). This equation says that the relative price of wheat (on the left) and the opportunity cost of wheat (on the right) must be equal in the no-trade equilibrium at point A. A price ratio such as PW/PC always gives the relative price of the good in the numerator (wheat in this case), measured in terms of how much of the good in the denominator (substance) has to be given up.

What is the marginal product of labor for televisions and cars in the home country. What is the marginal product of labor for televisions and cars abroad. Assume that the world relative price of televisions in the trade equilibrium is PTV/PC = 1. What good will each country export.

Use Figure 2-5 to show that an increase in the relative price of wheat from its global relative price of 23 will increase Home's utility. Opportunity Costs and Prices As in the Ricardian model, the slope of the PPF, which is the opportunity cost of production, is also equal to the relative price of production. Its slope is equal to -MPLA/MPLM, the ratio of the marginal products of labor in the two industries.

An increase in the relative price of goods In the absence of international trade, the economy produces and consumes at point A. We begin our study of the specific factor model by looking at what happens to the wages earned by labor when the relative price of goods increases. Similarly, the term DPM /PM is the percentage change in the price of the goods produced.

An increase in the relative price of PM/PA output can be caused by an increase in PM or a decrease in PA.

Figure 3-1, panel (b), graphs MPL M , the marginal product of labor in manufactur- manufactur-ing, against the labor used in manufacturing L M
Figure 3-1, panel (b), graphs MPL M , the marginal product of labor in manufactur- manufactur-ing, against the labor used in manufacturing L M

APPLICATION Prices in Agriculture

Movements in the real wholesale price of coffee (measured in 2012 dollars) are shown in Figure 3-8. Determine the impact of an increase in the price of agriculture on land rent and capital rent. Analyze the effect of an increase in the price of wheat on the allocation of labor between the two sectors.

In the no-trade equilibrium, the relative home price of computers was (PC/PS)A and computer exports were zero. In the no-trade equilibrium, the foreign relative price of computers (PC */P*S ) was A* and computer imports were zero. We see in Figure 4.5 that the relative price of computers in the free trade equilibrium lies between the relative prices without trade (confirming the expectation we had when drawing Figures 4.3 and 4.4).

An increase in the price of computers Initially, Home is in no-trade equilibrium at point A with the relative price of computers (PC/PS)A. An increase in the relative price of computers relative to the world price, as shown by the steeper world price line (PC /PS)W, shifts output from point A to point B. An increase in the relative price of computers shifts the relative demand curve from RD1 to RD2.

These declines mean that the real wage (in terms of any good) is reduced, and labor is clearly worse off because of the rise in the relative price of computers. That is, the increase in the price of computers (10%) leads to an even greater increase in the rent on capital (60%) and a decrease in the wage (−40%).

APPLICATION Opinions Toward Free Trade

S.-born workers 82% of

Determining Real Wages and Real Rents In addition to determining the amount of labor and capital used in each industry in the long run, we also need to determine wages and rents in the economy. Increase in the amount of domestic labor Suppose that, due to immigration, the amount of domestic labor increases from L−− to L−−′ = L−− + DL. In the long run, industry output adjusts so that the capital-labor ratio in each.

In this way the ratio of capital to labor in each industry is unchanged, and the extra labor in the economy is fully employed. In the long-run model, when capital can move between industries, an influx of labor has no effect on wages and rents. We have already seen from Figure 5-8 that more labor and capital is used in the labor-intensive industry (shoes), whereas less labor and capital is used in the capital-intensive industry (computers).

The Long-Term Effect on Industrial Output of an Increase in Home Work With an increase in the amount of work at home, the PPF shifts outward. In 1980, the year of the Mariel boat lift, the percentage of foreign-born people in the U.S. Short-run increase in capital stock In panel (a), an inflow of capital into the manufacturing sector shifts the marginal product of the labor curve in that sector.

The equilibrium in the labor market moves from point A to B, and the wage rises from W to W′. With an increase in the number of workers employed in manufacturing and an increase in capital employed there, the output of the manufacturing industry must rise.

Hình ảnh

16  Figure 8-12 and the welfare estimates in the following paragraphs are from James Harrigan and Geoffrey  Barrows, 2009, “Testing the Theory of Trade Policy: Evidence from the Abrupt End of the Multifi bre  Arrangement,” The Review of Economics and Statis
in 2010. Figure 1-1(b) shows that the export share of these same categories also fell  from about 80% to 40% over that time.
Figure 3-1, panel (b), graphs MPL M , the marginal product of labor in manufactur- manufactur-ing, against the labor used in manufacturing L M

Tài liệu tham khảo

Tài liệu liên quan

The estimates obtained in model Mod1 in Table 2 suggest that the real rate of returns on money and quasi-money, and the volatility of stock prices negatively affect the demand