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Leading Transformative Change Collectively

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Nguyễn Gia Hào

Academic year: 2023

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The purpose of dialogue in multi-stakeholder collaborations 131 Dialogic process facilitators: stewards of aliveness in collaboration. An understanding of the system (the field we intervene in or operate in) and its dynamics is essential for the successful implementation of multi-stakeholder collaborations.

Figure 0.1  The Sustainable Development Goals
Figure 0.1 The Sustainable Development Goals

It concludes with a troubleshooting guide to managing problems in multi-stakeholder collaboration, paying attention to the dimensions and aspects of the collective leadership compass and the four stages of the dialogical change model. However, such multi-stakeholder collaborations often fail to make the lasting difference they aim to make for a sustainable future.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.1: COMBATING MALARIA

While sustainability collaborative initiatives are not new, their level of quality has not kept pace with the increasing urgency and complexity of SDG challenges (Simon & Beisheim, 2016). However, none of the other participants were involved in drawing up the plan, and eventually the participants left thinking they would continue their work as they had before the meeting.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.2: RESPONSIBLE SUPPLY CHAINS

The transformative effect of a meeting with experienced experts was minimal, as they did not feel part of driving the change together. Although everyone would have agreed to fight malaria, no process had been developed to engage people in advance on how to collaborate and collectively become better at fighting malaria.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.3: CONSUMER AWARENESS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

However, this should not be seen as a failure of the idea of ​​multi-stakeholder cooperation to achieve the goals of sustainable development. Most of the key stakeholders stakeholders trust the expertise of the Yes No initiators of multi-stakeholder engagement.

Table 1.1  Why multi- stakeholder collaborations are a promising approach to SDG implementation 1 Decision-making    •  Drawing together expertise and perspectives from a number of  quality is enhanced disciplines and perspectives leads to a better underst
Table 1.1 Why multi- stakeholder collaborations are a promising approach to SDG implementation 1 Decision-making • Drawing together expertise and perspectives from a number of quality is enhanced disciplines and perspectives leads to a better underst

CASE EXAMPLE 1.4: COOPERATING FOR EMPOWERMENT

International multi-stakeholder collaborations take place when a solution to one or more issues surrounding the SDGs cannot be found within one country, i.e. if international multi-stakeholder collaborations are initiated and led by private organizations or NGOs, they are often more focused on implementation and less susceptible to political intervention.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.5: MAKING EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES TRANSPARENT

CASE EXAMPLE 1.6: ENSURING FORESTRY BECOMES SUSTAINABLE

CASE EXAMPLE 1.7: HONORING NATURE’S BEAUTY

The KAZA project is the involvement of local communities and the establishment of community protection zones. Collaborating partners include NGOs such as WWF and the Peace Parks Foundation (see www.kavangozambezi.org/en/ for more information).

CASE EXAMPLE 1.8: BUILDING ECONOMIC RESILIENCE FOR CASHEW FARMERS

CASE EXAMPLE 1.9: DIALOGUE FOR GREEN ECONOMIC ACTION

CASE EXAMPLE 1.10: TRUSTING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF TEXTILES

CASE EXAMPLE 1.11: STAKEHOLDER COLLABORATION FOR EMPOWERING DISPLACED PEOPLE

CASE EXAMPLE 1.12: STRENGTHENING YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS

It is also necessary to realize that multi-stakeholder collaboration almost always covers a range from consultation to collaborative processes. The desired outcome for SDG implementation determines which form should be chosen for a multi-stakeholder collaboration.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.13: STRENGTHENING EDUCATION

At the beginning of a multi-stakeholder collaboration, these events have the advantage of raising stakeholders' awareness of a particular issue of mutual interest, or may increase stakeholder interest in future collaboration. However, such meetings, if conducted well, create interest, promote the exchange of experiences, help interested parties get to know each other and prepare them for future cooperation.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.14: DIALOGUES FOR ECONOMIC STRENGTH

Sometimes a permanent structure is created in the form of an institutionalized multi-stakeholder dialogue and anchored in a governance rule. Institutionalized multi-stakeholder dialogues are conducted on an ongoing basis, or as the need arises, in accordance with publicly established rules and procedures.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.15: HEALING SOCIAL IMBALANCES

Governments and intergovernmental organizations committed to good governance can integrate multi-stakeholder dialogues into their regular implementation or planning processes. Multi-stakeholder platforms can be initiated by the public sector, the private sector or civil society.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.16: ENSURING SUSTAINABLE PALM OIL

Such multi-stakeholder platforms can act more like an informal network or a voluntary round table, or they can create a legal entity with members coming from different social sectors. In multi-stakeholder platforms, corporations can show that they are interested in sustainability, but not necessarily commit to binding targets.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.17: MANAGING WATER FOR LIFE

CASE EXAMPLE 1.18: CREATING A COMMUNITY FOR SUSTAINABLE COFFEE

Often, unequal expectations of actors in terms of speed and visibility of success need to be managed, as the operational logics and reporting cultures of private sector, public sector and civil society stakeholders differ. This helps raise awareness of the goals of the multi-stakeholder partnership, receive new perspectives and feedback, or adjust strategies.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.19: STRENGTHENING REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE

A thorough stakeholder analysis is therefore a key starting point for an effective approach to multi-stakeholder collaboration. However, multi-stakeholder collaboration initiated by the public sector is, in principle, focused on the common good.

Figure 1.2  Multi- stakeholder collaboration as shared interest
Figure 1.2 Multi- stakeholder collaboration as shared interest

CASE EXAMPLE 1.20: EMPOWERING SMALL AND MEDIUM SCALE ENTERPRISES

CASE EXAMPLE 1.21: MAKING THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT WORK

The private sector's core motivation is growth and business opportunity, so profit orientation is at the forefront, even though companies increasingly fail to see the need for sustainable development. Private sector stakeholders are primarily guided by their business strategy and are highly motivated to be loyal to the company.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.22: PARTNERING FOR DECENT WORK

Efficiency and strategic purpose are critical to their decisions, and they always need to make the business case for any engagement in multi-stakeholder collaborations. The motivation to enter into multi-stakeholder collaborations often lies in being able to influence the business environment (e.g. in multi-stakeholder dialogues with the public sector), to gain access to new markets, to reduce investment risks or to gain a reputation for sustainability engagement.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.23: STRENGTHENING COCOA FARMERS

Many civil society organizations work for a cause by raising awareness of pressing sustainability issues or building capacity to implement the SDGs. Despite the general value orientation of civil society organisations, they do not always share goals, rationales or interests, which can sometimes be contradictory.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.24: IMPROVING HEALTH SERVICES

Civil society organizations' modus operandi may center on campaigning against private sector companies' business practices, or advocating for policy change targeting government institutions. Civil society organizations are increasingly entering into partnerships with companies, for example to improve sustainability practices, build capacities of small-scale farmers in responsible value chains or advise on human rights practices.

CASE EXAMPLE 1.25: EMPOWERING FISHERY COMMUNITIES

To collectively lead transformative change in multi-stakeholder collaboration, this means looking at the vibrancy of systems at different levels – the vitality of individuals, the collaborative quality of the way actors work together as a thriving collaborative ecosystem, and how transformative change revitalizes natural ecosystems, communities, cities, countries and ultimately the planet. Similarly, the more “alive” stakeholder engagement ecosystems are, the more effectively they bring about change. They come from a core group of people – the initial container – who work together to initiate change.

Table 1.5 Source:
Table 1.5 Source:

Notes

It becomes the emotional home for the joint initiative and the initial pattern of the planned systems coming to life. High-level sponsors must be behind the cause of the multi-stakeholder initiative, but may not need to be directly involved. Building a change container is about creating a microcosm of an ecosystem of collaboration that will eventually bring about transformative change.

Figure 2.2  The three steps of Phase 1
Figure 2.2 The three steps of Phase 1

How many meetings are needed depends on the purpose and complexity of the initiative. In complex collaboration initiatives, it is a mandated function of the project secretariat to support high-quality process architectures that serve the coherence of the collaboration ecosystem. In Phase 3, it is important to help stakeholders experience the progress and results of the collaborative initiative.

Which cooperation partners do we need to influence the next level or to formalize or institutionalize the cooperation initiative. Ensure that the key stakeholders of the collaborative initiative agree on strategies to take the initiative to the next level of impact. Create professional leadership structures capable of leading to the next level of influence.

EXPLORING AND ENGAGING

BUILDING AND FORMALIZING

IMPLEMENTING AND EVALUATING

DEVELOPING FURTHER, REPLICATING, OR INSTITUTIONALIZING

CASE EXAMPLE 2.1: AN INTERNATIONAL EXAMPLE

THE GLOBAL COFFEE PLATFORM 1

As a result, a network of interested people emerged even before the official launch of the initiative in Phase 2. This was reflected in tangible results – the code of conduct for green coffee production was developed and the initiative began to focus on the operational challenges of disseminating the voluntary standard and engaging the wider community to implement it. This global membership organization - the 4C Association - was dedicated to implementing sustainability in the coffee sector.

CASE EXAMPLE 2.2: A NATIONAL EXAMPLE: FORESTRY MANAGEMENT IN LAOS 4

In this case, visible resonance for change was generated through an inclusive, participatory and creative visioning process that guided participants along a future sustainable wood value chain. On the final day of the workshop, the group presented their proposed vision for sustainable forestry, process roadmap and readiness to establish a multi-stakeholder TMP to four high-level representatives from the ministries involved, as well as the National Assembly. How we follow the practice of Dialogic structure and the quality of Practices to increase the quality of conversations.

Table 2.8  The application of the Collective Leadership Compass in Phases 1 and 2 for sustainable  forestry and trade in Laos
Table 2.8 The application of the Collective Leadership Compass in Phases 1 and 2 for sustainable forestry and trade in Laos

CASE EXAMPLE 2.3: A LOCAL EXAMPLE: THE NEBHANA WATER FORUM IN TUNISIA 7

How to determine • The serious mistrust between the water consultative conversations users and administration was clear and constructive joint from the beginning. How to shift the mindset • The interests of stakeholders not only diverged towards the common good, but were also narrow in that of water, to the greater sense that they lost sight of the picture. Collective intelligence occurs as a result of a high-quality dialogue - the outcome of a conversation or collaboration is better than the results that the individuals would achieve in isolation.

Table 2.9  Context understanding with the Collective Leadership Compass
Table 2.9 Context understanding with the Collective Leadership Compass

CASE EXAMPLE 3.1: STAYING IN THE COLLABORATIVE FIELD − TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE GREEN COFFEE PRODUCTION

At the level of the group process, the focus is on observing the quality of. It also means connecting not only the content but also the flow of the conversation with the larger 'story' that is consciously or unconsciously told about a certain reality. The better the dialogical quality of the conversation, the more functional the container for change – the main driver of success – becomes.

CASE EXAMPLE 3.2: DEVELOPING A FUTURE CHARTER FOR SDG IMPLEMENTATION

CASE EXAMPLE 3.3: WORKING TOWARDS A WHITE PAPER ON LAND MANAGEMENT IN CAMBODIA

Stakeholder meetings are small and temporary laboratories of collaboration that must occur when the objectives of the meeting are achieved. Logging out can highlight perspectives on the meeting while helping each other understand that there is a world beyond the meeting that is challenging for each of the participants. This means reviewing the results achieved, decisions taken or agreements reached in the plenary session at the end of the meeting.

Table 3.2  Design practices for co- creative conversations Design practice Guiding questions Examples
Table 3.2 Design practices for co- creative conversations Design practice Guiding questions Examples

CASE EXAMPLE 3.4: EXAMPLE FROM THE FIELD: TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE SUNDARBANS MANGROVES IN INDIA AND

From sovereign energy, we see in other people their value and potential without needing perfection – we want to contribute to them reaching their potential. Excellence • The level of knowledge in the stakeholder system about best practices and state-of-the-art approaches. Contribution • Level of stakeholders' awareness of their individual and joint contribution to improving the issue.

Figure 3.7  The leadership archetypes Source: Kuenkel, 2008; inspired by Cliff Barry
Figure 3.7 The leadership archetypes Source: Kuenkel, 2008; inspired by Cliff Barry

Hình ảnh

Figure 0.1  The Sustainable Development Goals
Table 0.1  Levels of skills development for multi- stakeholder collaboration
Figure 1.2  Multi- stakeholder collaboration as shared interest
Table 1.5 Source:
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