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PDF Working With Academic Literacies

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As such, the series seeks to explore how writing research and the advancement of writing development are encouraged locally and internationally. Title: Working with academic literacy : case studies toward transformative practice / edited by Theresa Lillis, Kathy Harrington, Mary R.

WORKING WITH

ACADEMIC LITERACIES

CASE STUDIES TOWARDS TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICE

INTRODUCTION

What is the "Academic Literacy" that contributors want to work with in this collection. An 'academic literacy' approach to writing by higher education students: drawing on Bakhtin to move from critique to design.

TRANSFORMING PEDAGOGIES

OF ACADEMIC WRITING AND READING

INTRODUCTION TO SECTION 1

The article by Adriana Fischer, focusing on an undergraduate engineering course in Portugal, seeks to explore the extent and ways in which the implicit or "hidden features" (Brian Street, 2009) of academic literacy practices can be made visible to both students and tutors. At the center of this paper is a focus on "play," with the authors arguing that play is an important way to encourage "participants to move out of their usual ways of writing and thinking." The paper draws on comments from workshop participants to illustrate the value of the approach taken and to explore the extent and ways in which such involvement can be considered transformative.

A FRAMEWORK FOR USABLE PEDAGOGY: CASE STUDIES

In the last part of the lectures, students are asked to explain one of the centers of their interest in the text and relate it to their studio practice. All of this presents a real challenge for most students in the nursing program described here.

Figure 1.1 illustrates how the elements in the framework are interrelated: vis- vis-ibility depends to a certain extent on criticality and both on accessvis-ibility
Figure 1.1 illustrates how the elements in the framework are interrelated: vis- vis-ibility depends to a certain extent on criticality and both on accessvis-ibility

WORKING WITH POWER

A DIALOGUE ABOUT WRITING SUPPORT USING INSIGHTS FROM

With that distinction, I think you're opening a critique of the kind of theory that sees power simply as something you can escape from. We can help students find those parts of the academic culture where they feel at home, and resist those parts of the culture that alienate them.

AN ACTION RESEARCH

INTERVENTION TOWARDS OVER- COMING “THEORY RESISTANCE” IN

The following week I conducted two identical hour-long sessions with the two halves of the student cohort. In total, 24 drawings were made during the two sessions with colored marker on A2 paper. Illustrations 1 to 7 in Figure 3.1 are scans made from a selection of the students' original drawings and highlight some overall metaphorical themes.

It encouraged independent exploration of the text according to their own initiative and/or interests rather than the teacher's agenda.

Figure 3.1: Drawing “theory resistance.”
Figure 3.1: Drawing “theory resistance.”

STUDENT-WRITING TUTORS

MAKING SENSE OF “ACADEMIC LITERACIES”

Students read Student Writing in Higher Education: An Academic Literacy Approach (Lea & Street, 1998) before one of the module's introductory seminars. Academic literacies argue [sic] then that problems with student writing lie [sic] at the level of knowledge and identity rather than skills or socialization. In her teaching practice, Laura explores the question of identity, making a connection between academic literacy and creative writing.

Laura considers how issues of identity can affect teacher/student relationships in Creative Writing and makes a connection between academic literacy and creative writing.

Figure 4.1: Sally’s conception of academic literacies   from reading Lea and Street (1998).
Figure 4.1: Sally’s conception of academic literacies from reading Lea and Street (1998).

HIDDEN FEATURES” AND “OVERT INSTRUCTION” IN ACADEMIC

LITERACY PRACTICES

A CASE STUDY IN ENGINEERING

I was one of the "education seekers" and the only person who focused specifically on language and literacy: the teachers explicitly asked for my cooperation—. The first draft of the project report was submitted by the students in week 8. What are the arguments or rationales related to the portable device and project objectives.

The connection between some aspects—"the common thread of the Report" was not noticeable.

Figure 5.1: Courses involved in the PBL methodology.
Figure 5.1: Courses involved in the PBL methodology.

MAKING SENSE OF MY THESIS

MASTER’S LEVEL THESIS WRITING AS CONSTELLATION OF

JOINT ACTIVITIES

Writing her thesis made her think not only about her experience of the place, but also about using language to convey this as an experiential story, but with academic rigor. With the above story, Vera showed how her desire to be creative in her writing matched the value system of the subdiscipline in which she and her supervisor worked. Norms arose in the interplay of the requirement that the thesis be graded, Sue's views on superficial features of academic texts, the values ​​of the subdiscipline indexed in the guidelines for autoethnographic research, and Vera's expectations of what constitutes a "true thesis". ' means. (see also Badenhorst et al. Chapter 7 of this volume).

Vera's choices and interpretations of advice made sense to her and Sue as part of the thesis research and writing.

THINKING CREATIVELY

ABOUT RESEARCH WRITING

Students in the Arts cohort came from philosophy, anthropology, music and the interdisciplinary Master's programme. First, it allows the individual to learn new ways of "seeing" the world and acting on it. An example of a “play” activity was freewriting about the research from the point of view of the subject (eg, the participant, the organization, the document) or outlining a research project as if it were on a stage in a theater.

We related these discussions to their place in the discourse and their role in the university.

DISCIPLINED VOICES, DISCIPLINED FEELINGS

EXPLORING CONSTRAINTS AND CHOICES IN A THESIS WRITING

In Sylvia's piece, which was an explanation of the meaning of a certain month, wayeb', in the ancient Mayan calendar, the voice was formal, impersonal, and distant. Furthermore, it is known that the contemporary Kiché Maya still consider the five days of wayeb to be ominous (Tedlock, 1992, p. 100). The consensus of the writing circle was that Makiko's writing was livelier and more accessible than Sylvia's, but interestingly, members had different feelings about the language choices that made it so.

Some admired the accessible first-person narrative of the author's dilemma and its resolution; a member commented.

HOW CAN THE TEXT BE EVERYTHING?

REFLECTING ON ACADEMIC LIFE AND LITERACIES

TRANSFORMING

INTRODUCTION TO SECTION 2

Through detailed text analysis and interviews with lecturers, it shows that the use of visuals and lists (preferred by Chinese native speakers) is as acceptable as writing in extended prose (preferred by British-English native speakers) in economics, biology and engineering disciplines . The authors present three vignettes of teachers working in school and university contexts in the United States, drawing variously on their creative writing group, blogging, and fan writing experiences to enrich their classroom practices. In particular, the chapter addresses the under-theorized area of ​​professional doctoral writing and draws on an analysis of feedback comments to highlight the unique features of the student-supervisor relationship in the context of professional practice.

Isabelle Delcambre and Christiane Donahue reflect on areas of overlap and divergence in how transformation is understood and worked with in the different fields of Littéracies Universitaires in France, composition studies in the United States, and academic literacy.

OPENING UP THE CURRICULUM

MOVING FROM THE NORMATIVE TO THE TRANSFORMATIVE IN TEACHERS’

UNDERSTANDINGS OF DISCIPLINARY LITERACY PRACTICES

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACADEMIC LITERACY INITIATIVE The initiative, described in detail elsewhere (Cecilia Jacobs, 2008), was implemented as a three-year institutional project bringing together ten partnerships between ALs and subject lecturers. This participant understood academic literacy instruction as uncritically introducing students to disciplinary literacy practices. I found it useful in my analysis of the data to represent these shifts as points along a continuum of understanding of teaching academic literacies (see Figure 9.1).

The "ways of thinking" and the reshaping of their conceptualizations of the teaching of academic literacies happened in the discursive spaces where this co-.

Figure 9.1: Continuum of understandings of the teaching of academic literacies.
Figure 9.1: Continuum of understandings of the teaching of academic literacies.

WRITING DEVELOPMENT, CO-TEACHING AND

EXPLORING THE CONNECTIONS

Although initially unaware of the hierarchy of authorship, the students already had some understanding of their identity as researchers and the difficulties of negotiation. Once students' awareness of the importance of author order had been raised, the presence of a struggle for their place in the research community was evident in subsequent aspects of the course. In a presentation by a journal editor, one of the students followed up on a point about the lack of recognition of their role due to the shift to third author on the research project.

These shifts in the thinking of the tutors also manifested in their teaching practices.

Figure 10.2: Photo 2.  ©  J. Ingle, 2012
Figure 10.2: Photo 2. © J. Ingle, 2012

TRANSFORMATIVE AND

NORMATIVE? IMPLICATIONS FOR ACADEMIC LITERACIES RESEARCH

CONCEPTS IN NUMERACY

In school physics, it is common to use the symbol 'α' to represent "is proportional to". When a physics teacher explains that if V is proportional to p, then as p increases V will also make a true statement, but it seems that in many cases teachers have not prevented students from concluding that the opposite is true. It is easy to see how if a student hears the phrase "is proportional to" in the context of noting how one variable is associated with an increase in the other variable, they will conclude that this is what the phrase means .

From the point of view many of the students apparently learned in physics class, their use of the phrase "is proportional to" was a correct description of the relationship they were describing, so simply correcting the language would have been confusing. to them.

STUDENTS’ PRIOR PRACTICES IN WRITING FOR SCIENCE

The action research project has been important to teaching and curriculum development, and significant changes have been incorporated into the curriculum based on the findings of the first cycle of action research. Based on research findings, which show that students are confused about some of the quantitative concepts, we have included more complete explanations of these concepts and showed students the reasons for their confusion. Thus, the collaborative research project has been very useful in informing ongoing curriculum development, but has also contributed to our academic development.

Tensions between textbook pedagogy and disciplinary community literacy practices: A study of writing in first-year economics.

LEARNING FROM LECTURERS

WHAT DISCIPLINARY PRACTICE CAN TEACH US ABOUT “GOOD”

STUDENT WRITING

Using EAP textbooks does not solve this problem because, as Chris Tribble points out, “most textbooks for writing . Within the student groups, most categories in the Chinese corpora show significantly greater use of a single textual feature than the English corpora. The corpus data presented in Table 12.2 indicate a greater use of visual features by Chinese students in the three disciplines.

Section headings, macrostructures and genre families in the BAWE corpus of student writing.

Table 12 .1 Discipline subcorpora
Table 12 .1 Discipline subcorpora

THINKING CRITICALLY

AND NEGOTIATING PRACTICES IN THE DISCIPLINES

In Thinking Writing at QMUL and in the North American Writing In the Disciplines (WID) programs, we do not teach language courses. It is gaining what feels like increasing momentum in the UK - and as a contrast to. Historical and ethnographic – especially longitudinal – studies of writing in HE, as well as in the professions beyond HE, provide insights into what I call forward-looking criticism.

Much of that research was practitioner-based, as writing consultants collaborated with teachers in the subjects.

ACADEMIC WRITING IN AN ELF

ENVIRONMENT: STANDARDIZATION, ACCOMMODATION—OR

TRANSFORMATION?

It suggests that the potential for a transformative approach in this context—for students and teachers—lies in moving away from "in English" as an authoritative rationale in EAP writing pedagogy, cultivating student agency in their writing choices, and encouraging critical. negotiation of practice and expectations. Interviews with four teachers about their experiences of writing in the education and their evaluation of these students' texts. From the teachers' perspective, more standardized norms were needed because of the difficulties that students' diverse writing practices often created for evaluation.

From the students' perspective, the need for more explicit norms arose especially during the first year of the programme.

Table 13 .1 Student participants
Table 13 .1 Student participants

Hình ảnh

Figure 1.1 illustrates how the elements in the framework are interrelated: vis- vis-ibility depends to a certain extent on criticality and both on accessvis-ibility
Figure 1.2: Dorothea Lang, Migrant Mother, 1936   [permission under Creative Commons].
Figure 1.3: Text objectified.
Figure 1.4: Text simplified: A slide used in an intervention   with communication arts students (excerpt from Gunning, 1994, pp57-58).
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